Cities in Motion

project status: Published in March, 2018

Bucharest

BArch 6th Semester Design Studio in the Platform for Geography, Landscape and Cities
Co-taught with Markus Schaefer and in collaboration with Anna Rose from Space Syntax, London and members from TUB-Bucharest
project status: Taught in Spring, 2008

This studio investigated the relation between urban morphology and different types of mobility, using Bucharest as a case study. Mobility is only one factor in the central function of cities: To facilitate access, including to other people, resources, jobs and ideas. Access is also increased by a city's organization, its density, performance or mix of programs. When studying mobility, the aim is to balance the requirements for infrastructures allowing for mobility with city residents' needs for access. Empirically, this often means reducing automobile dependency and increasing the share of modes of mobility that are more efficient (e.g. rail) and consume less space (e.g. biking or walking).

Since 1989, the number of private cars in Bucharest has dramatically reached a total of 1.3 million. They clog the streets during rush hours and dominate the public spaces of Bucharest's inner city when parked. The studio tapped into a recent private initiative, the "Transcentral Urban Bucharest" (TUB), which aims at improving public space, and built upon its existing framework of strategies to develop a series of specific interventions that address mobility, transfer between modes, urban densification and possible private-public partnerships.

Centrope

BArch 6th Semester Design Studio in the Platform for Geography, Landscape and Cities
Co-taught with Markus Schaefer and in collaboration with Jeff Kennworthy
project status: Taught in Winter, 2007/2008

An unprecedented number of people today enjoy an unprecedented amount of mobility. As a result, our cities and landscapes are currently built based on the availability of cheap, individual transportation. Yet, fossil fuels are increasingly problematic. Due to their growing scarcity they are the root causes of global climate change and international conflicts. The aim of the studio was to study forms of mobility and access in different global cities and assess their performance; to define scenarios for future forms of access where mobility is complemented with spatial and programmatic density; and finally, to test their implications by developing specific projects for Centrope, defined as being "strategically located in the heart of the New Europe" including Vienna, Bratislava, Brno and Györ.

The studio formed an overarching concept for the region. The transfer of insights from the research on illuminating the wider topic of cities and mobility. Collectively, the projects aimed at illustrating possible strategies for the region operating between the scales of regional identity and urban prototype.